USSR Foreign Policy

USSR Foreign Policy

USSR Foreign Policy

USSR Foreign Policy

Excerpt

Whatever we understand by the term foreign policy, we have to agree that it never develops in a vacuum; it cannot be anything but a reflection of the conditions existing in the world as a whole. Since 1917, the year of the Russian Revolution, the history of the world has been seriously affected by its repercussions. Such has been, of course, the case with all revolutions. Such was the effect on the rest of the world of the American Revolution, such was the effect of the French Revolution of 1789.

The new regime in Russia was met with hostility just as were the new regimes created by other revolutions. The rest of the world did not take kindly to the advent of innovations ushering radical changes in the existing order. The result was harmful for both the adherents of the old and the pioneers of the new. In our time the harm was probably even more disastrous, more profound, than in the past.

It is not advisable to speculate on "ifs," but one is justified in believing that if there were a better understanding between the "old" and the "new" both would be spared much suffering and trouble. If, instead of mistrust, suspicion and animosity toward the New Russia there had been understanding and mutual respect, could there have been the tragedy of Pearl Harbor, and the very war, started by Japan, continued by Mussolini's Italy and developed to its climax by Hitler? In other words, if by that time there had existed a united front of peaceloving nations, including, of course, the mighty U.S.S.R., is it likely that Japan would have dared to attack Pearl Harbor? Is it likely that Hitler would have dared to start his last mad act, the war for domination over the world? Were they not encouraged by the disunity of the others?

Fortunately for all decent human beings Hitler's formidable military machine (built not without some outside approval and even help) was finally routed, even after all the mistakes of the past including the long avoidance of co-ordinated effort, and after considerable reverses and heavy losses resulting from disunity, quarrels, disagreements and lack of co-operation . . .

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