The Making of Modern New Guinea

The Making of Modern New Guinea

The Making of Modern New Guinea

The Making of Modern New Guinea

Excerpt

While preparing for the field trip to gather material for this book, the author addressed an inquiry concerning New Guinea to a shipping firm in New York whose vessels are known in most of the world's ports. The answer, probably dictated by some harried clerk, is a fair sample of the average Westerner's lack of information about even the geographical location of the largest habitable island of the globe. It said: "We are sorry to report that at present we have no ships scheduled to call in this part of South America." The South Seas in general, and especially the island of New Guinea, have long been a story-book realm to the public at large, a savage, tropical waste. Few think of it as an increasingly important area for the political and economic strategy of the great nations and the scene, as Hogbin puts it, of countless "experiments in civilization."

The cloak of obscurity which has shrouded the land is now slowly lifting. The remarkably successful utilization of modern machinery, especially the aeroplane, in the economic development of the remote interior of the Territory has caught the public fancy during the past decade. The discovery, by both private and government exploration, of great untouched native populations in the central regions has fired the human interest of both scientists and laymen. And, more recently, Japan's attempt by force of arms to test the possibility of Oceanic expansion toward a Greater Asia has caused statesmen, strategists, and shippers, as well as the democratic peoples at large, to focus their attention more and more on the problems of the Pacific. No one can believe that Hirohito's little men were in any danger of confusing the South American Guianas with New Guinea; and, by the same token, it behooves all . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.