The Education of Shakespeare: Illustrated from the Schoolbooks in Use in His Time

The Education of Shakespeare: Illustrated from the Schoolbooks in Use in His Time

The Education of Shakespeare: Illustrated from the Schoolbooks in Use in His Time

The Education of Shakespeare: Illustrated from the Schoolbooks in Use in His Time

Excerpt

Shakespeare did not write an autobiography, and our knowledge of him is limited. We know that he was born in 1564. He probably went to the Stratford Grammar School, and was there presumably until 1580. This study purposes first to outline the education usual in those days, as described in the books written for teachers, showing what should be taught, and how it should be taught, and secondly to describe and quote from some of the textbooks in use during Shakespeare's schooldays.

Before taking up the detail of instruction at his time let us examine the sort of education that had come down from ancient days; this cannot be better illustrated than by the Margarita Philosophica, first printed in 1503.

The Margarita Philosophica, from which the picture of the Tower of Knowledge is taken, was the first modern encyclopedia of any note, based on the late Latin models. The author, Gregorius Reisch (born at Balingen, Württemberg; died at Freiburg, in 1523), studied at Freiburg (1487), where he received his bachelor's and master's degrees. He became a Carthusian, and was made prior at Freiburg, and confessor to Maximilian I; he was also the teacher of Eck and Waldseemüller, and assistant to Erasmus. The Margarita Philosophica consists of twelve books, and contains a compendium of the Trivium, the Quadrivium, and the natural and moral sciences. Its popularity is shown by its having been published in sixteen editions in the course of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.