For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in Sao Paulo, 1920-1964

For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in Sao Paulo, 1920-1964

For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in Sao Paulo, 1920-1964

For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in Sao Paulo, 1920-1964

Synopsis

Weinstein combines exhaustive and careful research with a stimulating critique of the existing bibliography on this theme.

Maria Légia Prado, University of Sao Paulo

Excerpt

On January 26, 1942, Getúlio Vargas, as dictator of Brazil's Estado Novo, created the National Service for Industrial Training (Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial, or SENAI). Four and half years later, Vargas's successor, Eurico Dutra, still operating within the constitutional framework of the Estado Novo, created the Industrial Social Service (Serviço Social da Indústria, or SESI). Neither event was attended by great drama or fanfare, but both represented important new developments in the area of Brazilian social policy. These developments were not just new but unusual, since both of these agencies were to be funded and operated by associations of industrialists rather than by the state that had decreed them into existence. and they were unusual not just in Brazil but in global terms as well, since it would have been difficult during the 1940s, when the role of the state in industrial relations and everyday life was expanding, to find another society where responsibility for vocational training and social services was being assigned to essentially private organizations. By government decree, Brazilian industrialists had acquired jurisdiction over two agencies that would prove central to industrial relations and worker discipline.

This book is about the origins of senai and sesi and the roles they played in the industrialists' campaign for greater productivity and social peace. the actual founding of senai and sesi can be attributed to specific historical circumstances, but the forms and practices they assumed reflected a discourse of rationalization and scientific management that had . . .

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