Social Process

Social Process

Social Process

Social Process

Excerpt

By Roscoe C. Hinkle

If republication of a scholar's works is any measure of the significance and relevance attributed to him by his successors, Charles Horton Cooley does indeed occupy an unusual position among his own generation in the perspective of post-World War II American sociologists. With this reissuance of Social Process, which has followed the earlier reprinting of Human Nature and the Social Order and Social Organization, all of his basic volumes are again available. No other eminent sociologist of his generation has been so recognized. Only Sumner Folkways has been reprinted in its entirety. Recently, excerpts from his, Ward's, and Ross's writings have been published. But not one of Giddings' or Small's books has been similarly treated. Compared to his colleagues, Cooley has been uniquely favored.

It would be genuinely impossible within the confines of this Introduction to explore the varied import and significance of Social Process for modern sociology. For instance, the volume is an illuminating document of the formative period of the discipline in this country. It exemplifies the vital concern of sociologists with issues of reform and the character of their proposals seeking social amelioration (e.g., war and peace, class and race conflict, poverty, population quantity and quality, competition and equality of opportunity, pecuniary valuation, as in . . .

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