Implication and Linear Inference

Implication and Linear Inference

Implication and Linear Inference

Implication and Linear Inference

Excerpt

My object in the present work is to develop and elucidate the non-syllogistic principle on which my Logic was founded. In order to make the central idea clear, I have permitted myself some detailed criticism of other writers, while I have abstained from complicated systematic construction. Still following Mr. Bradley, and influenced further by Mr. Joseph, especially in the distinction between Syllogism and Deduction, I have laid even more stress than before on the principle of coherence, and have insisted on "implication" as a term free from reference to reasoning in its traditional shapes.

I have thus been able, as I hope, to do much more justice to Mr. Bradley's positive account of inference than was done in my former work.

The contrast expressed in the title of the book has forced itself on me continually, not only in the logical studies of which specimens appear in my criticism, but in all common-senseargument and observation, and in actual acquaintance with reasoning as conducted by great writers and capable publicists. It may be illustrated by contrast with such facts as are referred to in the following passage from Professor Sorley Moral Values and the Idea of God:

"Their method [that of the eighteenth-century . . .

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