The Sudan's Path to Independence

The Sudan's Path to Independence

The Sudan's Path to Independence

The Sudan's Path to Independence

Excerpt

On 2nd September 1898 Lord Kitchener entered Omdurman after the famous battle early that morning. The Sudan was a country in which there were only three small primary schools, no hospitals, no formal courts of law. There was widespread want, and fear.

On Ist January 1956, at a ceremony in Khartoum in the grounds of the Palace of the British Governor- General, the national flags of Britain and Egyptwere slowly lowered, and the tricolour flag of the newly independent sovereign Republic of the Sudan was hoisted in their stead. At that ceremony the peoples of this vast 1,000,000 square-mile territory in the north-eastern sector of Africa were formally accorded independence as a nation by their joint alien rulers of the previous fifty-seven years.

By reaching this goal in such a short space of time the Sudanese became, to a certain extent, pace- makers for a number of other British controlled African territories at a similar stage of constitutional and political development. By making a democratic parliamentary constitution work in the two-year transitional experience of self-government, the Sudanese provided a basis for similar approaches . . .

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