Rochester, the Making of a University

Rochester, the Making of a University

Rochester, the Making of a University

Rochester, the Making of a University

Excerpt

All living institutions are growths. Good seed in good ground develops sturdy fruit. This book, with its author's earlier study, Rochester and Colgate, brings together the results of a painstaking examination of the archives of the University of Rochester and of contemporary records of important events in its history. In this the author has rendered a valuable and most generous service to his alma mater; for a knowledge of an institution's origins and of its past is of importance for the reason that only in such knowledge can the present be rightly understood or the future intelligently contemplated.

Two influences shared in the work of founding the university: a desire on the part of residents of the increasingly important region of Rochester and the Genesee Valley for the development in that region of an institution for broad and liberal education, a desire which took definite though ephemeral form in the charter granted in 1846 to residents of that region by the legislature of the state of New York for a university to be located at Rochester; and the desire developed at about the same time among many leading members of the Baptist denomination in the state for an institution of broad and liberal education, to be located in some growing city in the central or western portion of the state, which would furnish good soil for the growth and good promise for the support of such an institution. These two desires, joined together . . .

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