The Rediscovery of the Frontier

The Rediscovery of the Frontier

The Rediscovery of the Frontier

The Rediscovery of the Frontier

Excerpt

Early census returns in the spring of 1930 announced that Oklahoma City had a population of over 184,000. Edna Ferber Cimarron, a best-seller of this same spring, looked back only forty years to the spectacular transformation of Indian Territory into Oklahoma. Both the census returns and the popular novel served as reminders that the opening of this district marked the closing of the frontier. Yet this reminder could be given only to the historians and other students who already knew that the frontier had always been significant in American life, and never more so than in its disappearance. Most of the country is still indifferent to the fact. Millions of ostensibly educated easterners lump everything beyond Pittsburgh and Buffalo into an indeterminate West. In 1928 they found that they had nothing to . . .

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