Peachtree Mound and Village Site, Cherokee County, North Carolina

Peachtree Mound and Village Site, Cherokee County, North Carolina

Peachtree Mound and Village Site, Cherokee County, North Carolina

Peachtree Mound and Village Site, Cherokee County, North Carolina

Excerpt

In December 1983 the Civil Works Administration assigned 11 archeological projects to the Smithsonian Institution for supervision and scientific direction. This was part of a large Government program for reducing unemployment. For several reasons the Institution was pleased to accept the responsibility this unusual opportunity afforded. First, it was eager that the results be as extensive and as scientifically complete as conditions would permit; second, it offered its archeologists an opportunity to extend their research, especially in the Southeast, which previously had been sadly neglected.

The choice of sites was necessarily limited by climatic and economic. factors. All projects were launched within 2 weeks and accounted for the employment of 1,500 laborers. Besides this North Carolina project, seven were in Florida, under the immediate direction of M. W. Stirling, Chief, Bureau of American Ethnology, and one each in Georgia, Tennessee, and California.

Harry L. Hopkins, Julius Stone, and especially the late Morton M. Milford, all Federal CWA officials, greatly facilitated the work by their interest and cooperation here in the Washington office.

This report deals only with the excavation of the Peachtree Mound and village site near Murphy, N. C. (fig. 1). Work began December 21, 1933, and ended April 1, 1934. The project was under the administration of W. B. Colburn. His ability as coordinator in keeping the project functioning smoothly permitted Jesse D. Jennings to devote his entire time to directing the excavations. Cooperation was received from the State and local CWA officials, who furnished 104 men. Acknowledgments are due to William Moore, who permitted the excavation on his property, Burnham S. Colburn, F. O. Scroggs, R. Teems, Hobart Hughes, and other local men whose interest was a large factor in effecting a first-class job. The foremen and laborers performed their duties willingly and became considerably interested. In 1935 Hobart Hughes and Dale Lee again assisted by making two smaller excavations, giving a further check . . .

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