D. H. Lawrence & Susan His Cow

D. H. Lawrence & Susan His Cow

D. H. Lawrence & Susan His Cow

D. H. Lawrence & Susan His Cow

Excerpt

In his back yard at Taos, D. H. Lawrence had a cow named Susan. This creature, whose temper seems to have deserved neither respect nor love, claimed the respect and love of her master. He celebrated her in one of his essays, ". . . . Love Was Once a Little Boy," mentioned her frequently in others, and allowed himself to be photographed with her, as the reader of the collected letters may see for himself. To Lawrence, Susan was a cow, good to pursue with loud cries and good to milk in the cool of the evening:

Cow Susan by the forest's rim
A black-eyed Susan was to him
And nothing more--

But, though he denies it in these playful verses, she was something more. To him she was also a religious object and a symbol of life and salvation. "How can I equilibrate myself with my black cow Susan?" he asked. ". . . There is a sort of relation between us. And this relation is part of the mystery of love. . . . The queer cowy mystery of her is her changeless cowy desirableness."

Some may be inclined to put Lawrence down for a fool; for it cannot be denied that he sounds foolish. But one must remember that Lawrence was a man of great gifts, probably a man of what we call genius, that a . . .

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