A Short History of International Affairs, 1920 to 1934

A Short History of International Affairs, 1920 to 1934

A Short History of International Affairs, 1920 to 1934

A Short History of International Affairs, 1920 to 1934

Excerpt

The increasing interest shown by the public in questions of foreign relations has suggested the production of a brief history of the course of international affairs since the War, summarizing the main developments in a single volume. This suggestion -- which came, I understand, originally from the publishers of Professor Toynbee annual Survey of International Affairs -- was adopted by the Publications Committee and the Council of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, at whose invitation I accepted the task of preparing such a volume. In order to catch up with the stream of rapidly moving events, it has been necessary to work quickly, and the task would have been impossible without making use, to an extent which calls for the fullest acknowledgement, of the material ready to hand in Mr. Toynbee Surveys, which have been placed unreservedly at the writer's disposal as a basis for his work. The use made of these volumes has occasionally even gone so far as the incorporation of their actual phraseology, and the same strict limitations of the subjectmatter have been adopted: neither the domestic history of particular countries, however important, nor events in the sphere of British Imperial relations having been included.

The book is not, however, in any sense an abridgement of the annual Surveys. Many matters of minor importance, included in them, have been altogether omitted, in order to find space for adequate treatment of the principal issues. The material has been freely handled, and for the arrangement and presentation, as well as for the views expressed, the author is alone responsible. Many other sources have been utilized, especially articles and information in the fortnightly Bulletin of International News, issued from Chatham House, and addresses published in the Journals of the Royal Institute of International Affairs. In the earlier chapters, constant reference has been made to the History of the Peace Conference of Paris, the first work published under the auspices of the Institute. In dealing with the Turkish peace settlement, an event which neither the History of the Peace Conference nor the annual Surveys . . .

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