Georg Simmel, 1858-1918: A Collection of Essays, with Translations and a Bibliography

Georg Simmel, 1858-1918: A Collection of Essays, with Translations and a Bibliography

Georg Simmel, 1858-1918: A Collection of Essays, with Translations and a Bibliography

Georg Simmel, 1858-1918: A Collection of Essays, with Translations and a Bibliography

Excerpt

This volume illuminates facets of an inexhaustible human being. It follows that there are many aspects of Georg Simmel that are not represented here. However, the book will at least acquaint the reader with the catholicity and originality of his intellect.

An even more modest aim of this volume is to introduce the reader to the many areas that Simmel explored. It is unfortunate that--particularly in the United States--he is known chiefly as a sociologist, or more narrowly as the inventor of "formal sociology." The papers that follow should broaden this view. Three of them--Donald N. Levine's, F. H. Tenbruck's, and Hugh Dalziel Duncan's--will correct and deepen our understanding of Simmel the sociologist. Matthew Lipman's paper shows that because of his interest in social phenomena--and not in spite of it--the individual was one of Simmel's primary concerns. E. V. Walter articulates Simmel's conception of power and demonstrates the importance of this conception. Howard Becker's exposition of Philosophie des Geldes conveys the significance of Simmel's analysis of money as a socioeconomic phenomenon, and its importance as a basis for his diagnosis of our time. Rudolph H. Weingartner discusses Simmel's philosophy of life, which--abroad more than here--has been the occasion for granting Simmel fame (and giving him a too restrictive label). Mr. Weingartner also shows that the dichotomy of form and content which is central to Simmel's sociology pervades all areas of his interest. Gertrud Kantorowicz' Preface to a collection of Simmel's essays, which was published posthumously, also addresses itself to his philosophy of life. The high tone of her essay may serve the reader to form high expectations of both Simmel and the treatment he receives in this volume; he may wish to read it first to form these expectations, and then to read it once more to test them, after he has inspected the remaining analyses and the translations.

Other essays in the volume include discussions of Simmel's . . .

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