The Apache Indians

The Apache Indians

The Apache Indians

The Apache Indians

Synopsis

Cochise. Geronimo. Apache Indians known to generations of readers, moviegoers, and children playing soldier. They enter importantly into this colorful and complex history of the Apache tribes in the American Southwest. Frank C. Lockwood was a pioneer in describing the origins and culture of a proud and fierce people and their relations with the Spaniards, Mexicans, and Americans. Here, too, is a complete picture of the Apache wars with the U. S. Army between 1850 and 1886 and the government's dealings with them. When The Apache Indians was first published in 1938, Oliver La Farge called it "the best study we have of... the military campaigns." Dan L. Thrapp, noted historian of the Apache wars, has written a foreword for this Bison Book edition.

Excerpt

A book on the Apache Indians was to have been the work of my friend, Charles Morgan Wood. Indeed, he gave much thought and labor to the subject and at the time of his death had made considerable progress toward the achievement of this cherished purpose. He had long been in poor health, but he had leisure and unbounded enthusiasm for the enterprise, and its pursuit enlivened and brightened the closing days of his life. We were fellow enthusiasts in the field of Southwestern history, drawn to our studies and researches more in the spirit of cultural recreation and by a desire to be of service to the state we both loved than by the ambition to be known as historians. As friends we read, planned, talked, and traveled together--each absorbed in his particular project. My comrade was suddenly taken from my side with his task unfinished.

Ten years have passed, and having completed the three books I had set my heart on writing, I turn to the theme that had always interested both of us but which was his by common consent and priority of claim--The Apache Indian. Mr. Wood's book, both in aim and execution, would have been a very different one from this that I have written. Nor has it been my intention in any manner to attempt to carry out his unfinished work. His genial temper--half serious, half whimsical--always mellow with humor and the milk of human kindness--would have invested the book with a charm all his own that I must not hope to capture. But it would be ungracious, indeed, if I did not at the very beginning offer a tribute of friendship to . . .

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