Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil-Rights Days

Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil-Rights Days

Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil-Rights Days

Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil-Rights Days

Synopsis

This moving firsthand account puts the 1965 struggle for Civil
Rights in Selma, Alabama, in very human terms.

Excerpt

On January 2, 1965, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., came to Selma, Alabama, to recruit an army of nonviolent soldiers to wage a war against laws and customs that prevented blacks from voting.

Being a black American living in Selma didn't mean you automatically became a part of this army. The decision to join up was a matter of individual conscience for each man, woman, and child. Many did not volunteer.

Those who did made the choice at different times and under varying circumstances. This is the story of two members of that army, two young girls: Sheyann Webb, who was eight, and her friend and next-door neighbor Rachel West, age nine.

Neither emerged from her experiences an Afroamerican Joan of Arc, but both of them saw the battle erupt, both saw it through, and both lived to see the conclusion.

It could be argued that both merely took part, that they merely followed their elders, that neither could be described as a heroine.

But it also could be argued, just as surely, that to characterize their actions as anything less than heroic would be to do them both an injustice.

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