Modes of Perceiving and Processing Information

Modes of Perceiving and Processing Information

Modes of Perceiving and Processing Information

Modes of Perceiving and Processing Information

Excerpt

Since World War II the field of perception has developed in two major directions. The first evolved out of the traditional psychophysical approach and is manifest today in the new psychophysics. On the response side, the new psychophysics is characterized by the powerful analytic techniques of signal detectibility theory. On the stimulus side it is characterized by the adaptation of Fourier analysis to stimulus description--most recently in the visual domain.

The second direction is in the increasing bond between the fields of perception and cognition. The traditional empiricist view of perception has always regarded perception as a learning and problem-solving-like behavior. However, the data and experiments to this effect, and more important, the generative impact of this view, were never very convincing. The more recent, and, we believe, more productive ties between perception and cognition have evolved from the impact of cybernetics, information theory, communications, and artificial intelligence. These approaches have combined with a biological-functional orientation to produce significant advances in areas such as speech perception, space perception, and perceptual-motor coordination. From a biological-functional orientation it is not unreasonable to suppose that man has evolved general dispositions or modes of processing stimulation specialized for his vital daily activities-- communicating, problem solving, etc.

This volume grew out of the context of this second direction, a particular product of two workshops (held in the Spring of 1974 and 1975), organized by the Committee on Cognitive Research of the Social Science Research Council. The Committee on Cognition was organized in 1971 to encourage communication and interaction on specific problems in the area of cognition among the various social sciences. It has been the hope of the Committee to range broadly across . . .

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