The Life and Death of the Cold War: Selected Studies in Postwar Statecraft

The Life and Death of the Cold War: Selected Studies in Postwar Statecraft

The Life and Death of the Cold War: Selected Studies in Postwar Statecraft

The Life and Death of the Cold War: Selected Studies in Postwar Statecraft

Excerpt

During the academic year 1954-55, while preparing the first draft of the Brookings Institution book United States Foreign Policy: 1945-1955, I also wrote several more detailed studies of critical episodes in the birth and stabilization of Cold War politics. In 1956, while at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Palo Alto, I produced, with minor editorial changes, a multilith edition of these studies for use in my foreign policy course at the University of Chicago.

It had been my intention to engage in further research on the period, to footnote these studies more extensively and to publish them. However, other books intervened, including System and Process in International Politics (1957) and The Political Foundations of International Law (1961). Eventually, although students who used the materials and scholars from other institutions who asked for them on interlibrary loan urged me to publish, I never found the time to do the additional research that seemed necessary.

Recently, however, I reread the manuscript and now see merit in publishing these studies as they were originally written because certain significant observations about foreign policy can be made more easily if I follow this course.

I am at one disadvantage. Had I published this material in 1955, even without additional research, I would have put it through several revisions. Yet, if I revise the original draft now, readers may infer that I have retrospectively changed my interpretations.

Therefore, I will live with some infelicitous judgments that I might have changed even in 1955. But I gain the advantage of showing that contemporary historians have been creating a myth about the views that were held during the height of the Cold War-a myth at least as simplistic as that with which they charge others. However, I have added some identifications my editor has requested.

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