A History of Modern England - Vol. 4

A History of Modern England - Vol. 4

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A History of Modern England - Vol. 4

A History of Modern England - Vol. 4

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Twenty years had not elapsed since the end of the Crimean War when the relations between the Sultan of Turkey and his Christian subjects again threatened the peace of Europe. We have already seen how a revolt in Bosnia and the Herzegovina proved too much for the financial equilibrium of the Porte.1 When this insurrection had been in progress about five months, and there seemed no likelihood of Turkey being able to put it down, the Central Powers took counsel with Russia, and formulated joint proposals for the solution of an embarrassing problem. Their policy was communicated to Great Britain, France, and Italy, in a long and able despatch by Count Andrassy, Chancellor of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The object of the Powers, wrote Count Andrassy, was to "localise the conflict" by preventing Servia and Montenegro from taking part in it. For this purpose Europe should unite to press upon Turkey the establishment of complete religious liberty in the revolted provinces; the abolition of tax-farming, familiar to all readers of the New Testament; a guarantee that the Bosnian and Herzegovinian taxes should be employed for the benefit of Bosnia and the Herzegovina; the . . .

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