The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

Excerpt

News traveled slowly in 1831, but few newspapers in the United States failed to report with all possible speed that a bloody slave insurrection, led by Nat Turner, had broken out in Southampton County, Virginia. This dramatic attack against the South's "peculiar institution" proved in the end to be fruitless. The uprising was put down by armed force, Turner was captured and executed, and scores of Negroes--many of whom had taken no part in the revolt--were murdered in savage retaliation. But "nearly sixty whites" had died in the initial outbreak, and a wave of terror swept through every slave-holding state. Months earlier, in Boston, the first appearance of William Lloyd Garrison's antislavery newspaper The Liberator had made the South--and the nation--aware that the entire institution of slavery was coming under unremitting attack from zealous abolitionists in the North, although how effective that attack would be was as yet unclear. Turner's rebellion was an attack of a different and more terrifying kind. It was too close to home, too immediate a threat to the prosperity of King Cotton and Prince Sugar, too dangerous to life itself, to be forgotten when it was over.

The Southern master knew that he could not rest content with the capture of Turner and his accomplices, and that merely "a harsher and more vigilant discipline" over . . .

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