Governmental Methods of Adjusting Labor Disputes in North America and Australasia

Governmental Methods of Adjusting Labor Disputes in North America and Australasia

Governmental Methods of Adjusting Labor Disputes in North America and Australasia

Governmental Methods of Adjusting Labor Disputes in North America and Australasia

Excerpt

Human relations correspond in complexity to the many forms of human activities. Human society has long been one of interdependence. Especially in the present industrial world, where networks of railroads facilitate the rapid flow of transportation, where fleets of vessels carry on world-wide commerce and where millions of factories shelter countless machines and hosts of men and women toiling at their assigned tasks, interdependence has become one of the chief characteristics of human relations. The introduction of machinery necessitates a minute subdivision of labor which in turn increases the degree of interdependence between men and men as well as between one factory and other factories, between one manufacturing unit and the rest of the business units.

In this industrial society where the interests of its constituents are so intimately interwoven, the importance of labor can scarcely be exaggerated. Especially in the key industries, continuous operation of which is an absolute necessity, the human factor is undoubtedly of primary importance.

The many volumes of literature on industrial relations all recognize the simple fact that any conflict between employers and employees involves social loss. Any remedy which lessens the possibility of industrial warfare, must be, therefore, a contribution towards the promotion of public welfare. Economists and sociologists . . .

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