The Art of Southern Fiction: A Study of Some Modern Novelists

The Art of Southern Fiction: A Study of Some Modern Novelists

The Art of Southern Fiction: A Study of Some Modern Novelists

The Art of Southern Fiction: A Study of Some Modern Novelists

Excerpt

I shall want to be brief. There seems to me no need to explain, or to justify, the limits I have deliberately set upon the scope of this book. There are, of course, the alternatives of a two-hundred-page analysis of Carson McCullers' The Ballad of the Sad Café and a two-hundred-page "study" of a thousand novelists. Both of these are, of course, possible, and surely the latter is a task to be considered seriously (I should not want to be responsible for the former). In his Renaissance in the South: A Critical History of the Literature, 1920-1960,John M. Bradbury lists 524 novelists, plus hundreds of writers in other forms. He is an excellent critic and a careful historian; his book is indispensable. But there are two and one-half pages on Eudora Welty, four pages and eight lines on Katherine Anne Porter . Verbum sap.

The main purpose of this book is to put William Faulkner aside for a while and to give readers a chance to look at a few of his distinguished contemporaries or near- contemporaries. It is a commonplace of criticism (especially abroad) to speak of Faulkner and to close the matter of modern Southern Literature with a brief discussion or an extended discussion of his work. He is a worthy representative; one could do much worse than study him. But much very worthwhile literature is shunted aside as a result. So I have risked the experiment of bringing other writers to the foreground. Those who want many more names can consult John Bradbury's book. Those who wish . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.