Julian Huxley, Biologist and Statesman of Science: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Rice University, 25-27 September 1987

Julian Huxley, Biologist and Statesman of Science: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Rice University, 25-27 September 1987

Julian Huxley, Biologist and Statesman of Science: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Rice University, 25-27 September 1987

Julian Huxley, Biologist and Statesman of Science: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Rice University, 25-27 September 1987

Synopsis

Julian Huxley (1887-1975) was a man of many talents and enormous energy.

At the beginning of his career, he founded the Biology Department at Rice Institute, where he taught for three years before going on to achieve eminence as a biologist, statesman, and intellectual.

While this volume concentrates on Huxley's contributions to field and laboratory biology, it also provides the first in-depth examination of his efforts to popularize science and to advance the human species through eugenics.

The first part of the book places Huxley in a broad intellectual context and offers an overview of his contributions to biology as they related to major developments in twentieth-century evolutionary theory.

Huxley's biological work is investigated in more depth in the second part, while the third examines him as a public scientist and takes a new look at his efforts to bring biology and its potential benefits to the community at large.

It is hoped that the book will spur further research into Huxley's religious and social views and his public role in science.

Excerpt

Julian Huxley (1887-1975) taught at the Rice Institute for three years, from 1913 to 1916. At that time the Rice Institute had just opened its doors to its first class of students, and Huxley was at the beginning of his career. Huxley was one member of an outstanding faculty that Rice's first president, Edgar Odell Lovett, had recruited by traveling all over the United States and Europe. During his three years at the Rice Institute, Huxley founded the Biology Department and recruited a faculty, among whom was Hermann Muller. Huxley went on to a brilliant career as a biologist, statesman, and intellectual, but he never forgot his sojourn in Texas.

After Sir Julian's death in 1975, Lady Huxley made it possible for Rice (now a university) to obtain his papers. The papers were deposited in the Woodson Research Center of the Rice University library in 1980 and, after organization and cataloging, were opened to scholars in 1984. Lady Huxley was present at the opening ceremony.

In 1987 Rice held a symposium to mark the centennial of the founder of its Biology Department. At this event, which took place from 25 to 27 September, papers on various aspects of Huxley's career were delivered by scholars from the United States and the United Kingdom (see list of participants). This volume stems from the papers delivered on this occasion.

Julian Huxley was a man of many talents and enormous energy . . .

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