Justices and Presidents: A Political History of Appointments to the Supreme Court

Justices and Presidents: A Political History of Appointments to the Supreme Court

Justices and Presidents: A Political History of Appointments to the Supreme Court

Justices and Presidents: A Political History of Appointments to the Supreme Court

Synopsis

This new edition of this classic history of the Supreme Court discusses the selection, nomination, and appointment of each of the Justices who have sat on the U.S. Supreme Court since 1789. Abraham provides a fascinating account of the presidential motivations behind each nomination, examining how each appointee's performance on the bench fulfilled, or disappointed, presidential expectations.

Excerpt

This work has its genesis in a series of graduate seminars in constitutional law and the judicial process that I conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in the mid -- and late 1950s. The subject matter had always fascinated me, and while I lay aside writing this book in favor of other publications during the ensuing years, the project was never dormant. I gathered a host of data, developing a separate file for each of the one hundred individuals that have served on the highest court of the land, until the end of the Warren Court era in 1969 determined me to write what had been gestating for almost two decades.

What I had initially conceived as a fairly straightforward analysis of Presidential motivations in the appointment of the several Chief Justices and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, gradually evolved into a far more ambitious undertaking as the book took shape. Backed by the advice and counsel of sundry colleagues, it seemed almost artificial merely to cite reasons for an individual's selection without concurrently evaluating his subsequent performance on the bench. Thus, the book addresses itself also to the nominee's work on the Court, both in terms of Presidential expectations and in those of my own perception of his performance. Quite naturally the book expanded further by comprising what, in effect, is a "mini-history" of the Court . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.