Concentration and Control: A Solution of the Trust Problem in the United States

Concentration and Control: A Solution of the Trust Problem in the United States

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Concentration and Control: A Solution of the Trust Problem in the United States

Concentration and Control: A Solution of the Trust Problem in the United States

Read FREE!

Excerpt

This book is one of opportunism. Its aim is to present an outline picture of the situation regarding concentration of industry in the United States, and to suggest a way to gain its economic advantages and at the same time to guard the interests of the public. The book is written because this is the most pressing problem now before the people and before Congress and state legislatures. No other problem is likely to have so large discussion in the political campaign now waging. If this book has the good fate to assist in the rule of enlightenment, reason, fair play, mutual consideration, and toleration, and thus advance the solution of the problem, the author will have been repaid many fold for his labor in its preparation.

The scope of the treatment does not include the public utilities. They are only considered in so far as their development and control throw light upon the other industries.

The reader who is familiar with trust literature will recognize the influence of Ely Monopolies and Trusts, Jenks The Trust Problem, von Halle Trusts or Industrial Combinations of the United States, Ripley Trusts, Pools, nd Corporations, Montague Trusts of To-day, Nolan Combinations, Trusts, and Monopolies, Collier Trusts, Wyman Control of the Market, and Macrosty Trust Movement in British Industry.

Aside from these standard works, the most important sources of information in presenting a picture of the situation as it is at the present time are the special reports on manufactures in 1905 by the Census Office, reports of the Commissioner of Corporations upon Standard Oil, tobacco, steel, beef, lumber, and water powers, and the hearings and reports before the committees of the Sixty-second Congress. Especially important in this connection have been the hearings before the United States Senate Interstate Commerce Committee . . .

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