Great Britain from Adam Smith to the Present Day: An Economic and Social Survey

Great Britain from Adam Smith to the Present Day: An Economic and Social Survey

Great Britain from Adam Smith to the Present Day: An Economic and Social Survey

Great Britain from Adam Smith to the Present Day: An Economic and Social Survey

Excerpt

I thank my old Cambridge friend, F. W. Lawe, for the chart and statistical argument on pages 396-400. For assistance in the preparation of this book for the press I am indebted to colleagues at the University of Toronto as well as to friends in what I now call the Old Country, though I think of it still as did the young Virginian. I first learned to respect Canadians in a country that to them and me was overseas; and six years of university life in Canada have enlarged that respect into affectionate regard. If I have an economic ambition it is that by my writings I shall cause Canada and Great Britain to know each other more intimately. May the sure growth of Canada never obstruct, but on the contrary promote, the welfare of the Motherland from which so many of her sons have come. And furthermore, may Great Britain, through Canada, see steadfastly the essential friendliness of the U.S.A. towards the rest of the English-speaking world.

I owe the Index to my colleague in Economic History, H. A. Innis. The Introduction has already appeared as a Bicentenary Appreciation in Volume III. of the Dalhousie Review. As for myself, I am Lancashire-born. My grandfather, as a boy, was employed on the construction of the first coaches used on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, and later invented the through chain brake in the service of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. Some will say that my pride in the North amounts to an obsession; and certainly to me there is no place in the world so beautiful as the English Lakes. That industrial Lancashire is unsightly I know full well, but it is precisely when I have been in Dorsetshire, walking the Wessex country with a novel of Hardy in my pocket, that I have felt a great longing to explain and rejoice in the county of my birth. Progress comes by specialisation. Here are docks, mills and mines: there, two hours away, are Coniston and the Furness Fells, and these too are in Lancashire. But how can I enjoy them unless I believe, and try to show, that the throbbing life of industrialism will yet win through to happiness and beauty?

C. R. F.

TORONTO: Jan. 1928.

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