Social-Economic Movements: An Historical and Comparative Survey of Socialism, Communism, Co-Operation, Utopianism; and Other Systems of Reform and Reconstruction

Social-Economic Movements: An Historical and Comparative Survey of Socialism, Communism, Co-Operation, Utopianism; and Other Systems of Reform and Reconstruction

Social-Economic Movements: An Historical and Comparative Survey of Socialism, Communism, Co-Operation, Utopianism; and Other Systems of Reform and Reconstruction

Social-Economic Movements: An Historical and Comparative Survey of Socialism, Communism, Co-Operation, Utopianism; and Other Systems of Reform and Reconstruction

Excerpt

Today on every continent vast armies of men and women are asking how their economic and social institutions can be remolded so as to abolish poverty and war, assure full employment and high living standards to all peoples, and lay the foundation for a co-operative order dedicated to the service of mankind.

These aspirations, while voiced in greater volume today than in former generations, have constituted the warp and woof of the dreams and practical experiments of thinkers and doers for hundreds of years past. They have led to the rise of various schools of thought --utopian, Marxist, Fabian, syndicalist, guildist, communist, Christian and state socialist, among others. They have led to the formation of powerful consumers' co-operative movements, now conducting vast business ventures on a non-profit basis in every portion of the world. They have supplied the main impetus for the organization and development of great political parties--of labor and socialist parties which, in the years before the Second World War, constituted the governments or the chief opposition parties in Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, France, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Switzerland, and other lands; of the Communist party which directed the destinies of the widespreading Union of Soviet Republics; and of farmer and progressive groups. They have profoundly influenced the activities of trade and industrial unions and have entered into every phase of the cultural life of modern civilization.

In the days ahead, these movements--economic, political, cultural-- are likely to remold, to a far greater extent than in the past, the social and industrial institutions of the peoples of the world. To be ignorant of them is to be ignorant of the world in which we live and of the world's most challenging proposals for future social change.

Thousands of volumes have been written on particular schools of thought. No volume, however, has thus far appeared giving a com-

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