Reflections on Government

Reflections on Government

Reflections on Government

Reflections on Government

Excerpt

This book has been written in times of trouble, and no doubt it bears some marks of the times. But I hope that I have risen above national and temporary animosities; that I have not steeped myself unduly in the flood of the present; and that I have succeeded in looking at things, in some measure, sub specie diuturnitatis. I acknowledge, and indeed I am anxious to state, the limits of my outlook--limits deliberately imposed. The book is called by the name of Reflections on Government. But it does not include, nor is it intended to include, any reflections on international government. That theme goes beyond the area of government in the domestic sense in which I have understood the word; and it belongs to the sphere of another inquiry. Nor, again, does the book include any reflections on government outside Europe. (For that matter it does not include any reference to some forms of government in Europe--for example the Swiss form--which deserve the closest attention.) This, again, is a limit deliberately imposed. I am far from being forgetful of the United States, of the overseas Dominions, or of the great Empire and the great problems of India. But I have not sought to write a text-book, or to take the world for my province. I have simply sought to set down thoughts, reflections, considerations, suggested to my mind by the main movement of ideas and forces in the continent to which I belong and of which I am, in some sense, a citizen.

These thoughts, or reflections, or considerations, may perhaps be said to fall within the scope of political science, a subject in . . .

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