An Essay upon the Government of the English Plantations on the Continent of America (1701): An Anonymous Virginian's Proposals eor Liberty under the British Crown, with Two Memoranda by William Byrd

An Essay upon the Government of the English Plantations on the Continent of America (1701): An Anonymous Virginian's Proposals eor Liberty under the British Crown, with Two Memoranda by William Byrd

An Essay upon the Government of the English Plantations on the Continent of America (1701): An Anonymous Virginian's Proposals eor Liberty under the British Crown, with Two Memoranda by William Byrd

An Essay upon the Government of the English Plantations on the Continent of America (1701): An Anonymous Virginian's Proposals eor Liberty under the British Crown, with Two Memoranda by William Byrd

Excerpt

Sir,

I herewith send you a Transcript of that imperfect Essay upon the Government of the English Plantations on the Continent of America, which I shewed you when you were in these parts, and which you laid so many obligations on me to let you have.

It was at first designed for private view only, and accordingly it was drawn for that purpose, as you may easily perceive by many Passages in it, neither is it (in my Opinion) at all fit for the Publick; but since you have desired it so earnestly, I give it up intirely to you, to be disposed of according to your Discretion, only I must enjoyn you to conceal my Name, that I may not of necessity be engaged in a Pen and Ink War three Thousand Miles from home.

In pursuance of your request, I have (as carefully as my time and health would permit) once more perused the Discourse on the Plantation Trade, written by the Author of the Essay on Ways and Means; and I am still of the same Opinion that I told you; I take that Gentleman to be a Man of good Parts, but in this Discourse, I think he hath gone beyond his Province, for it appears pretty plain to me, that he went on blindfold, having an intire dependance upon the knowledge and integrity of those from whom he received his Informations; this I am obliged to believe, for certainly a Person of that Authors Abilities could never have written so incoherently and inconsistently upon a Subject that himself had any knowledge of.

I shall not trouble you with a particular Examination of every Paragraph of that Discourse; but I shall apply my self to the consideration of the most general of his Notions and the Principles he proceeds upon, and if the Foundation appears to be deceitful, I suppose the Superstructure will fall of course; but in the first place, it will be necessary to observe to you how very irregular, that Discourse is, and how incoherent the several Parts of it are one with another.

In some Places (p. 225, 226, 230, 231), he tells the World the great advantage of New-England, Mary-Land, Pensilvania, Carolina, &c. Furnishing the Southern Colonyes with Provisions, which . . .

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