Towards World Prosperity, through Industrial and Agricultural Development and Expansion

Towards World Prosperity, through Industrial and Agricultural Development and Expansion

Towards World Prosperity, through Industrial and Agricultural Development and Expansion

Towards World Prosperity, through Industrial and Agricultural Development and Expansion

Excerpt

At the end of World War II, making World War III impossible seems the most important task ahead. If the new peace is to endure, the United States must accept a share of international responsibility fully commensurate with our size and power. Today, most Americans seem determined to accept that responsibility. Our advocacy of and adherence to the United Nations and related specialized international organizations is a good omen of the firmness of that decision.

Peace and prosperity are interdependent. To most peoples of the world, freedom from fear would have little meaning without freedom from want. The difficult and as yet unsolved problems of establishing political cooperation and security between nations are much on the minds of all thinking persons. The corresponding problems of establishing the conditions for economic security and progress are not so generally recognized. This book is limited to those economic problems, leaving the broader problems of political statesmanship for others who are better qualified.

The vital possibility lies in maintaining employment in the developed countries and in also using the technical information and financial powers of the United States and other leading nations to help other nations help themselves. How this might raise both production and standards of living is set forth in Chapters I and II.

The rest of the book is devoted to the problems, opportunities, and plans for economic development in selected countries or regions around the world. Originally it was expected to include chapters for Japan and for additional regions of South America, but they were not ready in time. Each country or regional chapter is written by a person whose experience has given him extensive knowledge of the country or area concerned and has been reviewed by other experts. As editor I have tried to see that the several chapters have all addressed themselves to the basic economic problems. Each author has, however, been free to emphasize those aspects that seem most important to him. Each one takes the full responsibility for the views he expresses. My thanks and appreciation are due to the chapter authors for their willingness to undertake this task, many in the face of pressing official duties, and for their care and patience in the various revisions of their chapters. Thanks are also due to the many others who aided by their criticism of various chapters. Chapters I and II are based on three articles of mine . . .

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