Readings in the Family

Readings in the Family

Readings in the Family

Readings in the Family

Excerpt

This book of readings brings together discussions of the family for the purpose of introducing the student to a portion of the significant literature representative of historical and recent scholarship. It stresses the dynamic interpretation of family experience and the constructive aspects of the ever growing interest in the problems of the modern family. It is a product of the class-room experiences of the authors who, through their teachings of courses on the family, have been made to realize the need of such a book. Other instructors of college courses in the field of the family have by correspondence during the last decade also urged its preparation.

From time to time this book has been delayed by the pressure of other obligations, until it seemed wise not to put its material in final form until after the publication of The American Family. It follows the general outline of that text that it may serve as a source book for supplementary readings, but it is also adapted to independent use. The correspondence asking for such a book of readings on the family has come in part from those who felt the need of it for libraries. This purpose of the book also has been kept in mind throughout its composition. The authors have sought to furnish librarians, both college and public, a collection of readings that will give their intelligent clientele a comprehensive, interesting, and interpretative discussion of the family. The correspondence course on the family, carried on at the University of North Carolina, has also impressed upon the authors the usefulness of such a compilation for those interested in extension courses on the family now so rapidly developing in the form of study classes offered by churches, colleges, and parenthood organizations.

The authors have not allowed any personal bias or opinion to influence the choice of material and it is perhaps needless to say that readings are included for the purpose of stimulating discussions that do not express the convictions of the authors. Selection five of Chapter XVIII is an example of this. The amount of literature relating to the family is so great that it has proved no easy task to select what, from the point of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.