Eugene V. Debs, a Man Unafraid

Eugene V. Debs, a Man Unafraid

Eugene V. Debs, a Man Unafraid

Eugene V. Debs, a Man Unafraid

Excerpt

PIERRE SOLOMON was an artist. Even Old Man Peddle, Master of the Vandalia paint shops at Terre Haute, made grudging acknowledgment of that fact and looked the other way as Solomon puffed derisive clouds of smoke from his short-stemmed pipe onto the "No Smoking" signs inside the brick structure.

The fame of the coach work done in the Vandalia railroad shops had spread across all the Middle West by 1870. Skilled workers from other roads had a way of dropping off at Terre Haute to look for jobs there. The Vandalia was an insignificant link in the sprawling chains that were criss-crossing the prairie in those days, but very often coaches from some of the more important Eastern roads were sent down to Terre Haute for overhauling and ornamentation. Then Solomon was in his glory. Grunting with pleasure, he would wield a cunning brush on the sides of cars and locomotives, designing strutting roosters, flapping eagles, and at one time his masterpiece --the name of a palace car, The Jap , the letters consisting of combinations of minute figures of geisha girls.

One day an over-zealous official of the road on a tour . . .

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