Analysis of the Problem of War

Analysis of the Problem of War

Analysis of the Problem of War

Analysis of the Problem of War

Excerpt

Recently, the danger of being pulled into a war has aroused a frantic interest in our foreign policy. American thinking concerning international affairs has of course been disoriented during the past decade or so; before that, little attention had been given to international problems. Various theories have been offered to explain our entry into the World War, each claiming to be sufficient in itself, and each the proper basis for a solution of the problem of war. Many of these ideas are hasty and thoughtless; some of them are fantastic. The political situation arising from the effort to legislate us out of war has heightened the confusion.

War, of course, is no simple problem, and the effort to uproot it leads into many ramifications. It does seem possible, however, to seek out some fundamental principles by which to guide one's thinking, and to test the various schemes before us by these. The American people now have a real interest in the problem; and the dangers revealed in some of the current proposals, as well as their inconsistency with American traditions and principles, have disposed them to make a serious study of the problem.

There have been many organizations working, each in its own way, for peace, with a resultant confusion in the movement for peace which is shocking. The organization of the National Peace Conference, including over thirty of the leading national organizations working for peace in the United States, gives hope for improvement in this situation. The purposes of these groups vary, but they have . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.