Sherlock Holmes among the Pirates: Copyright and Conan Doyle in America 1890-1930

Sherlock Holmes among the Pirates: Copyright and Conan Doyle in America 1890-1930

Sherlock Holmes among the Pirates: Copyright and Conan Doyle in America 1890-1930

Sherlock Holmes among the Pirates: Copyright and Conan Doyle in America 1890-1930

Synopsis

This study focuses on the publishing history of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, tracing the story of the first two Holmes novels, which were widely pirated in the U.S. from 1890-1930. The book details the background that enabled piracy to occur and provides extensive descriptive lists of the various issues of A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four. The American issues are described in detail, with defects and inconsistencies clearly documented. Also included is a genealogical tree that traces the editions of these novels and thorough examples of their textual variations.

Excerpt

The present study in publishing history may be useful not only to students of Conan Doyle and enthusiasts of Sherlock Holmes, but to others concerned with the influence of Victorian British literature upon North America, and with the intricacies of copyright and publishing in the period before and after the emergence of formal international copyright.

Acknowledgment of support for the project goes to Queen's University at Kingston, for leaves of absence; to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for substantial support under Grant No. 410-85- 0045; and most particularly to many collectors and bibliographers of Sherlock Holmes, who have answered endless letters and endured visits; in particular (without slighting many others too numerous to mention) John Bennett Shaw, Ronald B. De Waal, Peter E. Blau, Cameron Hollyer, Janice McNabb Cox, Christopher A. Redmond; the long-suffering staff of Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library, and the Special Collections Department of the Meredith Willson Library, University of Minnesota.

The quotation from The Name of the Rose is used by kind permission of Prof. Dr. Umberto Eco. Reproduction of Sherlock Comes to America by Prof.Jay Finley Christis by kind permission of Carl F. Christ. The quotation from Facsimile is by kind permission of the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions.

D.A.R. Kingston, Ontario May 1989 . . .

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