Third Millennium Capitalism: Convergence of Economic, Energy, and Environmental Forces

Third Millennium Capitalism: Convergence of Economic, Energy, and Environmental Forces

Third Millennium Capitalism: Convergence of Economic, Energy, and Environmental Forces

Third Millennium Capitalism: Convergence of Economic, Energy, and Environmental Forces

Synopsis

Rogers explores the relevance of capitalism within a rapidly growing global community increasingly plagued by economic, social, political, and environmental problems. The importance of a nonpolluting global energy system and environmental protection measures is examined within the context of private enterprise.

Excerpt

As an engineer-economist-administrator for over 35 years in the fields of economic development, energy resources, and environmental protection, I have observed an increasing convergence of issues in these three areas, which I believe will present great challenges for capitalism in the Third Millennium. This convergence lies in the increasing scales of population settlements, technological innovation, industrial development, and energy resource utilization and the resultant larger and more lasting impacts of these activities on the natural and human environments. We are witnessing unprecedented population and economic growth and technological change on a worldwide basis. We are also experiencing environmental degradation in many regions of the world, which is no longer limited to localized impacts. Global warming of the atmosphere, air pollution, and contamination of large water bodies are becoming increasingly evident on multinational and even global scales. the implications of the world population explosion mandate global as well as national and regional actions if mankind is to survive with any sense of equity and reasonable standard of living.

I believe we must develop new approaches to economic development and energy resource utilization if the global environment is to be preserved in a form suitable for human habitation in the Third Millennium. We must rein in our international gluttony for resource exploitation and instead deploy the technologies and resources of private industry and the public sector in embarking upon a new course, one that is truly tailored to both human needs and the natural environment. This will require . . .

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