Economic Trend Analysis for Executives and Investors

Economic Trend Analysis for Executives and Investors

Economic Trend Analysis for Executives and Investors

Economic Trend Analysis for Executives and Investors

Synopsis

This book combines both a comprehensive analytical framework and economic statistics that enable business decision makers to anticipate developing economic trends. The author blends recent and historical economic data with economic theory to provide important benchmarks or "rules of thumb" that give both economists and noneconomists enhanced understanding of unfolding economic data and their interrelationships. The extensive appendix of monthly key economic factors for 1978-1991 makes this an important reference source for economic and financial trend analysis.

Excerpt

A widely held view of America is that it is an industrial giant threatened with economic decline caused by the reemergence of Japan and Germany as economic powers, the new competition from aggressive smaller countries such as Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, and the enormous competitive potential of Russia and China. It is not always recognized that the American industrial power of the last fifty years is actually a temporary aberration stemming from the defeat in World War II of two major industrial powers and the exhaustion of other victorious industrial nations. the highly competitive international economy that the United States is now experiencing was the norm rather than the exception for most of American history since colonial times.

During this history America was an aggressive and effective international competitor, providing job opportunities for a growing population. Economic and business matters received widespread attention. Our recent dominance of the international economy coincided with a decline in public attention to economic issues. the ending of the Cold War appears to be encouraging the reemergence of America's traditional emphasis on economic issues as the principal focus for political debate. Expanding practical knowledge about the American economy is therefore timely and important.

It must appear unusual for a noneconomist to have written a book on the technical subject of economic trend analysis. However, most of my professional experience -- first as a tax accountant, then as a corporate attorney, and now as an investment banker -- has been in-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.