Women/Men/Management

Women/Men/Management

Women/Men/Management

Women/Men/Management

Synopsis

This book looks at the real and perceived differences between women and men in organizations. Unlike most books on organizations, it attempts to integrate the theories of feminism and organizational behavior. In so doing it demonstrates why the issues of sex and gender are central to understanding organizational behavior. It finds that despite advances made in recent years, women and men still work in sex-segregated occupations. Women workers on the average earn lower pay than men and have fewer opportunities to acquire power and status. Men workers, on the other hand, receive less support than women in their efforts to balance work and family conflicts. Efforts to help women to adapt to a work environment dominated by masculine values have proved less than successful because they fail to address the broader issues. Organizations that hope to maximize their use of all employees must bring about cultural change through a broad, top down approach.

Excerpt

"What is the very first thing that you notice when you meet someone for the first time?" That question, a favorite of roving reporters or cocktail party guests, usually evokes answers such as "his smile," "her eyes," or "his hair." But the only true answer, of course, is "sex." Some people argue that race is more fundamental to identity than sex and therefore is the primary identifying characteristic, and that may be so. Nevertheless, most people find it essential to determine immediately the sex of another person with whom they interact. On the rare occasion when sexual identity is ambiguous or, even worse, in a case of mistaken identity, we are uncomfortable and embarrassed (Nielsen 1978).

A friend calls and says "Susie had her baby." The first question inevitably is "What did she have?" Your friend understands, of course, that your question is "Is it a boy or a girl?" For almost everything that happens to that baby from that point on will be affected by the answer to that question-the name it is given; the kinds of toys it will play with; the way it is handled, dressed, played with, and talked to; the nature of its relationships with other people; the way it will speak and be spoken to; the way it will be educated, evaluated, and entertained -- all these and more will depend on whether it is male or female. And these differences will begin at the moment of birth.

While the child is still very small, adults will begin to ask it "What are you going to be when you grow up?" And here the differences between boy children and girl children become critical. A boy child will very soon understand that what he becomes will be determined by what he does, that is, by his occupation or his profession. He will answer, "I want to be an astronaut," or a fireman, or a doctor. A girl child, on the other hand, will soon come to understand that what she will be is a function of who she is. She will soon learn to answer "I want to get married" or "I

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.