The Human Resource Professional: Tactics and Strategies for Career Success

The Human Resource Professional: Tactics and Strategies for Career Success

The Human Resource Professional: Tactics and Strategies for Career Success

The Human Resource Professional: Tactics and Strategies for Career Success

Synopsis

This first of its kind book addresses the very special tactics, strategies, and modes of behavior the human resource management function demands of those who want to succeed in a field that faces a work environment roiled by rapidly-changing technology, increased domestic and global competition, and an ever-changing work force. Not a book you merely read, it is a handbook that you will use at every step in your career. Kaponya takes you on the unique human resources career track, with a thorough, no-nonsense look at your success gradient as a human resources professional--the personal action steps, methods, and performance propellants that enhance the achievement every human resources professional wants.

Excerpt

Paul Kaponya, a friend and professional associate of many years, has written a work of unique interest to all practitioners in the human resource field. It will be of equal value to those in general management and to those at all other levels in functional areas of private and public enterprise. This volume goes beyond the typical explanation of service areas and procedures involved in personnel management and industrial relations. It satisfies a need throughout a field to understand, appreciate, and capitalize upon the talents that human resource specialists can contribute to the enterprise as a whole.

How far the typical enterprise has gone, from the days in which personnel managers were simply seen as "pencil pushers" or "happiness boys and girls." Why has this happened? To a substantial part, it is because the human resource field has expanded and matured internally, into greater areas of service. Top management has become more aware of the importance of greater employee involvement and its contribution to effectiveness in many Japanese firms, such as the keizan programs at Toyota. They have learned much from the best, more enlightened American companies, through the writings of CEOs such as ibm founder Tom Watson, of consultants and researchers like Tom Peters and Robert Waterman, and of human resource managers.

Further, American enterprise has become painfully aware that human resource services are needed to deal with increasing and more complex areas of governmental regulation and reporting requirements. This last phenomenon has also served to advance the stature of women in the human resource field. in the past, senior personnel executives often did not want to handle the burdens of government regulations and requirements. They looked upon these jobs as clerical work and . . .

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