Africa in the United Nations System

Africa in the United Nations System

Africa in the United Nations System

Africa in the United Nations System

Synopsis

This book analyzes the increasingly important role played by the African countries in the United Nations as they have become the largest regional bloc in the organization. Their participation in the New Economic Order, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, and efforts to reduce world tensions are critically discussed.

Excerpt

Any comprehensive consideration of world politics has to take into account the activities of African states within the United Nations system. African states are now part and parcel of the United Nations system. Through the United Nations Organization, African countries have joined other member states who are interested in reducing political tensions and conflicts among states, solving international disputes through peaceful means, supporting the right to national self-determination and independence for all colonized people, fostering peaceful and fraternal relations among the nations of the world, encouraging economic cooperation between the less developed countries (LDCs) and the Organization of Economically Developed Countries (OECD) through the framework of the New International Economic Order (NIEO), and raising the standard of living of the poor peoples of the ldcs. As members of the United Nations, African states are now involved with international issues that affect all peoples of the world. By being an integral part of the United Nations system, African states share in the success and failures of the United Nations Organization. Through participation in all of the bodies, organs, and the specialized agencies of the United Nations, African states are part of the un diplomatic and legal system.

One of the most notable aspects of the evolution of the United Nations has been the immense increase in its membership. Newly independent African states have contributed the largest number of these new members. Total membership of the uno has jumped from 51 in 1946 to 154 in 1981. in the same period, the number of African states in the United Nations increased from 4 to 51. (See Table 1).

The results of the increase of African membership in the United Nations have been mutually beneficial. the new African, Asian, and Caribbean states, by virtue of their majority in the United Nations and their numerous concerns and preoccupations have added new business and dynamism to the entire operation of the United Nations system. the United Nations has, in turn, acted as a magnet to African states that were overly zealous to set the seal of recognition to their independence through acceptance as full-fledged members of the United Nations Organization.

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