Bagdikian on Political Reporting, Newspaper Economics, Law, and Ethics: Lectures

Bagdikian on Political Reporting, Newspaper Economics, Law, and Ethics: Lectures

Bagdikian on Political Reporting, Newspaper Economics, Law, and Ethics: Lectures

Bagdikian on Political Reporting, Newspaper Economics, Law, and Ethics: Lectures

Excerpt

Ben Bagdikian has been a reporter most of his professional life. Graduating in 1941 from Clark University, he became a general assignment reporter for the Springfield (Mass.) Morning Union; a year later he was inducted into the Army. After three years in the Army Air Corps and one as an editor for Periodical House in New York City, he joined the Providence (Rhode Island) Journal and Evening Bulletin.

During the next 14 years, he served as general assignment reporter, national correspondent, foreign correspondent, and chief Washington correspondent.

He was part of a team that won the Pulitizer Prize in 1953 for local reporting. He also did his first work as a media critic while with the Providence papers. It is this talent for which most have come to know him best.

After his Providence tour, he was awarded another distinguished fellowship in 1962, by the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. In 1963 he became contributing editor to the Saturday Evening Post and continued with the Post for four years. During this period his study of poverty in the United States resulted in his first book: In the Midst of Plenty: The Poor in America.

He received the Sigma Delta Chi Society for Professional Journalists national journalism award in 1965, highest annual award from journalists to a journalist, and the National Headliners Award two years later, both for penetrating stories on social issues.

Mr. Bagdikian then assumed for two years directorship of a news media technology study for the Rand Corporation, out of which came the book The Information Machines: Their Impact on Men and the Media. Editions in Japanese, Swedish, and German were published two years later. During the 1960 s he was honored by Brown and Clark Universities with honorary doctoral degrees.

He returned in 1970 to the active news business at the Washington Post. He was assistant managing editor for national news at the Post. Later publisher Katharine Graham named him the Post's ombudsman -- a consumer's advocate in the newsroom.

Since then he has worked on foundation studies and contributed as a distinguished scholar, at Yale, 1972, at Syracuse, 1973, at Duke, 1974 . . .

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