Science and the Revenge of Nature: Marcuse & Habermas

Science and the Revenge of Nature: Marcuse & Habermas

Science and the Revenge of Nature: Marcuse & Habermas

Science and the Revenge of Nature: Marcuse & Habermas

Excerpt

The idea of this book began several years ago with an insight I could not then substantiate: that Herbert Marcuse's "new science" was not as unreasonable as it appeared at first glance. I think it was the purely utopian and thoroughly playful character of Marcuse's speculations that attracted me. Since that time, my interests have gone in several different directions, one or two of which are also reflected in this book. After several years of thinking about these issues, I understand better why Marcuse's "new science" has not been received more responsively. I have also come to appreciate the enormous energy and sophistication with which Jürgen Habermas has pursued his project. In the end, though, I would say that my preference for Marcuse's philosophy of science over Habermas' has not changed. What has changed is the enormous number of qualifications, stipulations, and additional considerations that I now believe must be brought to bear on this judgment. In a sense, that is what this book is about. It is also about why the willingness to experiment with utterly new categories of experience, as Marcuse does, is worthwhile.

I could hardly ignore the intellectual background and historical sources of the thought of Marcuse and Habermas, and I certainly . . .

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