Moderate and Radical Islamic Fundamentalism: The Quest for Modernity, Legitimacy, and the Islamic State

Moderate and Radical Islamic Fundamentalism: The Quest for Modernity, Legitimacy, and the Islamic State

Moderate and Radical Islamic Fundamentalism: The Quest for Modernity, Legitimacy, and the Islamic State

Moderate and Radical Islamic Fundamentalism: The Quest for Modernity, Legitimacy, and the Islamic State

Synopsis

Redefines the scope of modern Islamic thought, suggesting that Islamic fundamentalism might prove to be a liberating theology for the modern Islamic world & maintaining that the modern development of Islamic fundamentalism will have an impact on the history of Islam comparable to the impact of Protestantism on the history of Christianity.

Excerpt

More than ever, we live today in an interdependent world. No state, group of people, religion, or civilization can maintain itself in isolation from others. The unprecedented advancement of high technology in all walks of life, the expansion of multinational organizations, the rise of mass social and political movements, increasing state intrusiveness at a time of challenges to the nation-state, new popular quests for empowerment and legitimacy, and the reshaping of a new international order--all of these will remain as challenges of the twenty-first century. As a consequence, we will be forced to rethink our attitudes toward the role of the state and its relationship to technology, science, and religion.

We live in a globalized world, where local events can have an international impact. What happens in India, Egypt, or the United States is a concern not only to the Indians, Egyptians, or Americans but also to the rest of the world. Fundamentalism, as a powerful contemporary and future political and social movement, is neither limited to nor predominant in only one country or region. It is on the rise all over the world. Within the emerging new world order, religion is likely to play a major role in regional and international politics, whether it manifests itself in fundamentalist mass movements or in dynamic features of world civilizations. Hence, constructions of modernization, secularization, and rationalization are giving way to trends of postmodernization, religionization, and spiritualization.

The dawn of the twenty-first century will witness the forceful domination of the world by two powerful domains--concentrated capitalism and invasive technology--both of which are increasingly threatening to the dominant political construct of the nation-state and its nationalist ideology. The spirit and reality of technology and capitalism are, thus, contrary to the spirit and reality of nation-states. In addition, we are already witnessing the growing weakness of the . . .

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