The Changing Face of National Security: A Conceptual Analysis

The Changing Face of National Security: A Conceptual Analysis

The Changing Face of National Security: A Conceptual Analysis

The Changing Face of National Security: A Conceptual Analysis

Synopsis

This book contains a probing and comprehensive theoretical analysis of the emerging notion of national security in light of the dramatic post-Cold War transformation of the international system. It begins with a discussion of the nature of this change, emphasizing declining national sovereignty, escalating international interdependence, and proliferating anarchic conflict. After developing a framework of the conceptual components of national security, this study focuses on analyzing change--both in priorities and tradeoffs--in military security, economic security, resource/environmental security, and political/cultural security. Brief case studies of the 1991 Gulf War, the 1991 Maastricht Treaty, the 1992 Earth Summit, and the ongoing Yugoslavia conflict illustrate the theoretical contentions. Finally, a set of crucial, fundamental security policy challenges and responses conclude the book.

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to reconceptualize national security in light of the new strategic challenges posed by the end of the Cold War. The study downplays many important security topics -- the history of national security, defense strategy and tactics, weapons and force structures, and the nature of defense bureaucracies. Instead, the focus here is a probing theoretical analysis of how the recent dramatic transformation in the global context has fundamentally altered the nature of security. The changes in this new era are significant and sweeping enough to create an acute need for assessing the emerging patterns and generating new thinking conducive to managing an increasingly complex, anarchic world. Traditional modes of defense analysis have decidedly not become obsolete, but they need substantial reexamination and revision to cope with this transformation. Although this work is conceptual, the hope is that both scholars and policy makers will find its analytical frameworks and insights useful, as it explicitly attempts to consider implications not only for recasting existing theory but also for reassessing existing policy.

This task is certainly a tall order, as much security theorizing during the Cold War now seems irrelevant, little broad defense . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.