Family, Justice, and Delinquency

Family, Justice, and Delinquency

Family, Justice, and Delinquency

Family, Justice, and Delinquency

Excerpt

Eli Levi, 20 years old, was born in an Israeli kibbutz. He grew up in the children's house sharing his toys, feelings, and thoughts with his peers. While working in the various branches of agriculture, he finished high school. Then he enlisted in the Israeli Defense Forces (I.D.F.) to become a paratrooper. During a weekend furlough he decided to go to Jaffa to visit his cousin Mordechai. Coming off the bus, Eli saw Mordechai standing at a street corner of the neighborhood and talking to other chach-chachim. Mordechai was also in his twenties, but he did not finish high school, let alone fifth grade. His mother was never home when he came back from school and could not watch him. She had to clean houses in order to support the family. His father has been for many years partially disabled, unemployed, and often drunk. He would yell at Mordechai and tell him to stop wasting his time with school nonsense, to go to work instead and make money. Sometimes, he would even beat his son with a belt. Mordechai also never really worked. He is a delinquent known to the police. He did not enlist in the I.D.F and cannot find a job. He likes to visit Eli and listen to his stories about kibbutz cooperation and equality. He often wonders whether things would have been different had he been raised in the kibbutz.

Like Mordechai, many children in Israel and America are neglected, battered, and stripped of their self-respect. Their ties to their parents are weak or broken. Normless, they are indifferent to the consequences of their actions or to the fate of their victims. The abyss of drugs and delinquency is open to them.

In this book, several institutions affecting children are examined within a Rawlsian perspective of justice as fairness. The first principle of justice requires equality of liberty for all, the second allows for socioeconomic inequalities only if they improve the prospects of the least advantaged under . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.