Chinese Negotiating Style: Commercial Approaches and Cultural Principles

Chinese Negotiating Style: Commercial Approaches and Cultural Principles

Chinese Negotiating Style: Commercial Approaches and Cultural Principles

Chinese Negotiating Style: Commercial Approaches and Cultural Principles

Synopsis

How precisely do the Chinese negotiate contracts and other agreements? Do they follow conventions similar to those of Europeans? To the Japanese? Is there a pattern or style to their negotiations? These are the types of issues examined and resolved in Pye's guide. The volume is based on extensive interviews with Americans and Japanese who have had considerable first-hand experience negotiating with the Chinese, and an effort has been made to highlight the areas in which there has been the greatest amount of confusion and misunderstanding for American business people.

Excerpt

Before the night of the Tiananmen Massacre, relations between the United States and China were progressing remarkably well. Trade expanded every year, cultural exchanges were bringing the two peoples closer together, and tourism was mushrooming. Then, after the shooting of students who were demonstrating, China became a pariah country and the U.S.-China relationship plummeted into a deep freeze--except for the astonishing fact that trade continued to expand. Yet, even in the euphoric pre-Tiananmen days of "China fever," I was worried that cultural differences could cause disillusionment and bad feelings. Therefore, I decided to explore the misunderstandings that could easily arise from differences in Chinese and American commercial negotiating styles and practices. This potential source of trouble can become an even more critical matter in the post-Tiananmen context of political strain.

It is in the spirit of hoping to prevent later disillusionment and bad feelings that I have set out to identify and analyze a potential source of trouble: misunderstandings that can arise from differences in commercial negotiating styles and practices.

It is certainly a paradox that businessmen should have become key actors in building a new relationship between capitalist America and Communist China. Yet as long as corporate executives, entrepreneurs, bankers, and traders have become so important in shaping the new relationship, it is . . .

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