The Making of Psychology: Discussions with Creative Contributors

The Making of Psychology: Discussions with Creative Contributors

The Making of Psychology: Discussions with Creative Contributors

The Making of Psychology: Discussions with Creative Contributors

Excerpt

This book is the eleventh in a series based on discussions with outstanding contributors to the field of psychology; this is the first book in the series to include discussions with a number of contributors and to represent a diverse range of areas in psychology. To assist in understanding the goals of the discussion style used here, as well as its content, some perspective may be of value. This series was launched in 1957 with completion of recorded conversations with the late Carl Jung and the late Ernest Jones (Evans 1964, 1976), supported by a grant from the Fund for the Advancement of Education. Continued support for the series has been provided under a grant from the National Science Foundation. The basic purpose of the project is to produce, for teaching purposes, a series of films and books that introduce the student to significant contributors in the field of psychology. It is hoped that these films and books may also serve as documents of increasing value in the history of the behavioral sciences.

The interviews presented in this book are designed to introduce the reader to the contributor's major ideas and points of view, hopefully conveying through the extemporaneous discussion a feeling of the personality of the contributor. The contributors included in this volume were selected to represent the major areas of psychology reflected in current introductory psychology textbooks. However, no effort was made to provide a complete coverage of the field. Many of the individuals included here have produced significant ideas in more than one area of psychology. One of the characteristics of creative contributors may be that their work cannot be easily pigeonholed into any one field in psychology.

The sample of contributors included in this volume, although not exhaustive, is at least representative. In looking over the field, it is obvious that there are many other contributors who might just as easily have been included here. And, in fact, they may be included in a second volume.

When we completed the first book in the series based on discussions with Jung and Jones (Evans 1964), we thought the word conversation best described the process and content of the material. We soon learned that this implied to some potential readers something a bit more casual . . .

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