Japan's Emergence as a Modern State: Political and Economic Problems of the Meiji Period

Japan's Emergence as a Modern State: Political and Economic Problems of the Meiji Period

Japan's Emergence as a Modern State: Political and Economic Problems of the Meiji Period

Japan's Emergence as a Modern State: Political and Economic Problems of the Meiji Period

Excerpt

One word of apology is due the reader, and that is for the excessive number and length of the notes. Since the footnote has become the bane of modern academic writing some justification may be called for. The chief plea is that this study is something in the nature of a pioneer work in Western languages. Hence it was difficult or rather impossible to dismiss many of the minor, but no less interesting problems by a mere reference to works already existing in European languages. Rather than follow each digression to its logical end within the text itself, and in order not to break the thread of the chief argument too often, it was considered more fitting to relegate them to the comparative obscurity of a footnote. As some of the more controversial questions also appear in these notes, it is hoped that the reader who has the patience to consult them will gain an inkling of a few of the historical problems which are exercising Japanese scholars.

The titles of all Japanese works have been translated into English when they appear for the first time and afterwards are cited only in transliterated Japanese. Japanese names appear in the conventional manner--that is the family name preceding the given. Unless stated otherwise all quotations from Japanese sources have been translated by the author who thus accepts full responsibility for any errors and crudities in the English approximations.

The author would like to take this opportunity of expressing his warmest appreciation for the patient help and fruitful suggestions which his colleagues on the International Secretariat of the Institute of Pacific Relations have so generously contributed. To Mr. R. Tsunoda and Dr. Hugh Borton, both of Columbia University, the author is deeply indebted for the many corrections and valuable references which they have so kindly offered from time to time. A similar debt has been incurred to Mr. S. Tsuru of Harvard University whose penetrating criticism has been of the greatest aid especially in matters relating to Japanese economic history.

Ottawa, January 1, 1940 E. H. N.

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