Workingman's Wife; Her Personality, World, and Life Style

Workingman's Wife; Her Personality, World, and Life Style

Workingman's Wife; Her Personality, World, and Life Style

Workingman's Wife; Her Personality, World, and Life Style

Excerpt

An increasingly important, and economically substantial segment of our society -- the working class -- has, in the past, received only glancing attention from most of the writers reporting on the American class system. Recently, however, the economic importance of this class is beginning to be recognized. The fact is that the members of the working class in America form a group of major importance to every company which seeks a mass market for its products or services. This group is of vital concern to every advertiser who uses the mass media, and it is the target of most of the advertising communications prepared by American advertising agencies. Unfortunately, many of the businesses which, to operate profitably, must sell to or communicate with this class, fail to recognize its importance or its existence. These businesses do not recognize either the economic power of the group, or the differences inherent in it, which make communicating with it a special kind of problem. It is the purpose of this book to set forth in some detail the life style of the working class family, and to provide some clues regarding how best to reach these people with advertising and sales messages.

Since 1940, we have seen a steady growth in the income and consumption level of the working class family. As consumers they are no longer restricted to the basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter. They need no longer limit themselves to the cheapest possible products. Now, in fact, they have become a tremendous market, and often the major market, for a fantastic range of products.

No producer of consumer goods can expect to join the ranks of the "Billion Dollar" corporations unless it produces and sells with an eye on the working class consumer. Some indication of the power of this market is shown by the growth of certain corporations or businesses which took as a goal service and sales to the working class. Sears, Roebuck and Co. is an outstanding example. From the time that Sears moved into retail operations, it has deliberately catered to the tastes and desires of the masses of America. In 1940, when the working class was just recovering from the Great Depression, Sears' volume was $700,000,000. Today, the company's annual sales are over $3,000,000,000. It was during this period -- the years 1940 to the present -- that the working class was expanding its level of consumption at an unprecedented rate.

Even in the financial field, in the business of lending and saving, the power of the blue collar worker has been felt. The savings and . . .

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