Educated American Women: Life Styles and Self-Portraits

Educated American Women: Life Styles and Self-Portraits

Educated American Women: Life Styles and Self-Portraits

Educated American Women: Life Styles and Self-Portraits

Excerpt

This is the third and final volume which presents the results of studies of talented persons initiated in 1960 by the Conservation of Human Resources Project at Columbia University.

At first the research staff used the term "talented" to describe the men and women who had won graduate fellowships at Columbia University during the 6 years following the conclusion of World War II, that is, between 1944-45 and 1950-51. The primary objective of this research, which was supported by the Carnegie Corporation, was to learn what had happened in the intervening decade and a half to these intellectually capable individuals in the pursuit of their careers. Our method for eliciting information was the use of a carefully constructed questionnaire.

We were not very far along in our analysis of the early replies when we noted that a high proportion of the women respondents were taking us to task for the inadequacy and inapplicability of our questionnaire for them. They contended that, because of its many questions about continuous work experience, it was relevant primarily to the study of men. Upon reflection we found that we agreed. We therefore excluded women from that study and concentrated on bringing the investigation of talented men to a successful conclusion. The results were published under the title Talent and Performance, Columbia, 1964.

In 1963 we obtained a grant from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund . . .

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