The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from Anaxagoras to Wundt

The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from Anaxagoras to Wundt

Read FREE!

The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from Anaxagoras to Wundt

The Classical Psychologists: Selections Illustrating Psychology from Anaxagoras to Wundt

Read FREE!

Excerpt

"THE CLASSICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS" is a companion volume in the field of psychology to the author's "The Classical Moralists" in the sphere of ethics, and also to his "Modern Classical Philosophers" in the domain of philosophy. Its aim is to present in a series of selections some of the most essential features of the psychological doctrines which have appeared from Anaxagoras to Wundt. The book is thus virtually a history of psychology, not derived from an ordinary description of systems, but based upon extracts from original sources and upon translations of the authors themselves. Such a work, it is hoped, may prove adapted for colleges and universities as a text-book of reading accompanying courses of lectures in general psychology, and may become a necessary requirement of study made of all students before entering upon the study of the special divisions of existing psychology. The general reader, moreover, will find it an interesting volume of original material of the great psychologists from the earliest to the most recent times.

From Aristotle's "De Anima" there is reproduced at the outset the first extant history of psychological theories. With the name of Anaxagoras, who emphasizes the Nous as present in all things, but with insight as to its different forms in mind and matter, it was thought the work might fittingly begin. Empedocles is mentioned, who maintains that like is known by like, and that perception is due to elements in us coming in contact with similar elements outside. Democritus is also included, who believes the soul to consist of atoms, the peculiar fineness, smoothness, and mobility of which cause perception and thought. The second selection is taken from the Theaetetus of Plato, which Professor Jowett describes as the oldest work in psychology that has come down to us, and which here contains the contending Sophistic and Socratic views on the nature . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.