Collective Security: A Record of the Seventh and Eighth International Studies Conferences, Paris 1934--London 1935

Collective Security: A Record of the Seventh and Eighth International Studies Conferences, Paris 1934--London 1935

Collective Security: A Record of the Seventh and Eighth International Studies Conferences, Paris 1934--London 1935

Collective Security: A Record of the Seventh and Eighth International Studies Conferences, Paris 1934--London 1935

Excerpt

The International Studies Conference has carried out, during the past two years, a study of the problem of Collective Security. This volume is a record of the Conference's work.

It is perhaps desirable to recall, very briefly, the origins, organization and activity of the Conference.

In 1928, a meeting was held in Berlin, under the auspices of the International Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, to enquire into the possibility of bringing about a coordination on an international scale of the institutions in the different countries devoted to the scientific study of International Relations. Representatives of national institutions in Austria, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, and the United States, and of four international institutions were present at this meeting. They outlined a scheme of practical collaboration, to be put into operation with the assistance of National Co-ordinating Committees and of the International Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, and they decided that another meeting should be convened the following year. Thus came into being the International Studies Conference.

Membership of the Conference is confined to scientific institutions working in a spirit of objective and disinterested research. No institution, whether official or private, engaging in political propaganda or in direct political action, is admitted to membership.

The Conference has met annually since 1928, in London in 1929, Paris in 1930, Copenhagen in 1931, Milan in 1932, London in 1933, Paris in 1934 and London in 1935, its permanent Secretariat being provided by the International Institute of Intellectual Co-operation. It now groups together the national institutions in fifteen countries as well as five international institutions, while negotiations are at present under way for the participation in the near future of representatives of institutions belonging to a number of other countries.

During its first years of activity, the Conference, seconded by an Executive Committee, devoted itself to the essential task of co-ordination. Interchanges of speakers and professors, exchanges of information, publications, programmes of study, bibliographies, etc., and the preparation by the Institute of various handbooks of information, such were the chief manifestations of this collaboration.

To these practical activities the Conference has in recent years added the function of co-operative research and discussion. This work is conducted on principles of complete impartiality: no attempt is made . . .

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